Susquehanna Lock House Museum

One of the most historic landmarks in Havre de Grace, MD is the old Lock House built in 1840 as a residence for the Lock Tender and his family. Located at the top of the Chesapeake Bay, users of the Susquehanna and Tidewater Canal had to pay toll here to continue downstream.

The canal ran some 45-miles to Wrightsville, Pennsylvania and served as part of the nautical trade route of the day between Baltimore and Philadelphia.

The Lock House itself is in great condition, having seen many upgrades and restoration projects recently and now serves as a museum. Visiting this town during the pre-dawn hours always gives me a feeling of having stepped back in time. Perhaps its the quietness of this quaint location by the bay that causes me to visit at least once annually.

Located in Havre de Grace, MD, the Southern Terminal of the Susquehanna and Tidewater Canal was built in 1836. It is also listed as a national historic district to show it's importance to the maritime industry. The image above was taken just after sunrise. I walked a short distance along the canal shoreline to line up this reflective moment.

This next shot was taken when I first arrived on the site during the waning minutes of the morning blue hour.

This is the back porch of the lock house, which faces the Susquehanna River as it empties into the top of the Chesapeake Bay. Imagine sitting on this porch during the 1800s watching the ships go by day and night. Sounds pretty relaxing, huh? Such was part of the life of the lock house Tender and his family.

Next we have a look at the actual front of the lock house.

I found it curious that there are two front entrances to the lock house and wondered if this structure was once two individual houses. The chimney and upper window that are dead center of the home seem to indicate otherwise. In any case, for a building that is 176 years old, it looks great. 

Inasmuch as I am an early bird and the museum hours are Sunday through Friday, 1:00 pm til 5:00 pm, I was long gone by the time they opened on my last visit. I will make a special trip to see the inside and create some images of some of the historic items and get a feel for what life must have been like living here.

Until next time, thanks for visiting!