Baltimore Maryland

Locomotive 305

Happy July 4th America!

Independence Day, celebrated by many countries around the world, came to America in 1776 and is commonly known as the Fourth of July. There will be many outdoor activities since this occurs during the early Summer. Cookouts, days spent at the beach, family outings at theme parks, all will culminate with celebratory fireworks displays.

It's a day of pride and patriotism.

Since that proud and joyous day back in 1776, this country has developed into a huge nation, part of which was made possible with the large contribution of the railroad industry. Businessmen and inventors forged alliances to begin the process of building railways in the 1820's with the Baltimore and Ohio (B&O) being incorporated in 1827.

I have visited the B&O Railroad Museum many times and since that industry played a key role in America's expansion, I thought it appropriate to highlight one of the historic pieces housed there today.

Enter Locomotive 305.

Camelback Locomotive 305
Camelback Locomotive 305

Click image to enlarge or purchase ~

One of the centerpieces of the B & O Railroad Museum is the completely restored Camelback Locomotive built in 1869. Of the several hundred built with this design, only two remain, making this an extremely rare piece of history.  In 2003, heavy snows caused the roof to the museum to collapse, severely damaging many of the historic cars housed inside, including this one. The restoration work was completed and the unit returned to the roundhouse in June of 2011.

During the restoration it's original number 305 was returned, it had been renumbered 217 back in 1884. But now she stands as a symbol of ingenuity, strength and pride.

Thanks so much for visiting!

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4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM

Falls Avenue Canal

Welcome back, everyone! One of the benefits of living in close proximity to major waterways that lead to the ocean, are the countless scenes of beauty. Today we focus on a canal in downtown Baltimore. It is flanked by East and West Falls Avenue and it connects to the inner harbor, which in fact, is a part of the Patapsco River. What was once a heavily industrialized area with a skyline full of cranes to load and unload ships, has been transformed over the years to hotels, offices and living spaces.

The image taken below looks southward toward the harbor. In the background you can see one of the many bridges that connect the entire perimeter of the inner harbor area, allowing pedestrians to walk from one side to the other, although that walk is quite a distance.

Falls Avenue Canal
Falls Avenue Canal

Click image to enlarge or purchase ~

The sun was dropping quickly on this early Fall evening and this area had become heavily shaded, which added a very soft lighting situation.

Thanks for visiting!

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4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM

Old Yeller

Hello friends! If you arrived looking for the yellow mongrel of Disney movie fame, I apologize. ;-)

This post features another "old yeller", a vintage yellow train resting in the B & O Railroad Museum of Baltimore. This photo was taken when I visited there in early 2011. After that wonderful visit I was "riding the rails" quite often here on this blog, but I haven't posted a train shot in some time. Let's get right to it!

Old Yeller
Old Yeller

I decided to go with this rear door shot, feeling that the entire car was just a bit much in this color. :-)

The image is a 3-bracket set which I cropped. Being a bit of a stickler for detail I normally would have had those cleats on the upper portion of the car right up to the edge of the crop but in this case I didn't want to remove the American Flag showing around the left side. By the way, this is a Pullman class passenger coach (circa 1930). There is even a spittoon placed at the back door. No word on whether this was considered an amenity or not. LOL

Thanks for visiting!

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4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM

Domino Sugar

The Domino Sugar plant in Baltimore has been a landmark of the industrial area of Locust point. With it's 120 foot neon sign that illuminates in a bright red during the night, it has become a historic icon for 60 years. I can recall this being one of the dominating features of the Baltimore harbor in the days before the inner harbor was developed into the tourist and entertainment venue that it is today. This is truly a sign from another era. The image below is a shot of the plant from across the Patapsco river in Locust Point. I had hoped for better weather on this visit but was met with cloudy skies.

This particular vantage point is just down the road from Fort McHenry where the Baltimore harbor was successfully defended from the British during the war of 1812. The fort is also the birthplace of the Star Spangled Banner. We'll cover the Fort in a future post.

Domino Sugar Plant
Domino Sugar Plant

Update: I followed the advice of my friend Wayne Frost and brightened up the lettering on the iconic neon sign above the plant. Thanks, Wayne!

Thanks for visiting, everyone!

4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM
4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM
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4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM