Chesapeake Wooden Boat Builders School

Delaware Tug

Delaware Tug

The historic Delaware Tug was restored in 2011 then unveiled for public display in 2012, its 100th birthday. She was built by the William H. Smith in Bethel Delaware (1912) and now resides in...

Winnie Estelle

Winnie Estelle

When I visited St. Michael's earlier this year and stopped by the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, one of the historic boats that captured my attention was the Winnie Estelle, a 1920s Chesapeake Bay buy-boat. A buy-boat, as the name implies, is used to buy and sell seafood. These vessels would travel up and down the Chesapeake Bay and buy oysters and others seafood directly from harvesters.

1939 North East MD

1939 North East MD, a strange title, I know. I came upon this in The Chesapeake Wooden Boat Builders School in Havre de Grace Maryland where there was an old photo showing the family that owned one of the canoes that had been refurbished, complete with a copy of the original ownership papers. I was seeing and touching a piece of history.

1939 North East MD
1939 North East MD

This photo is resting in the actual canoe shown in the 1939 photo. The family seemed happy and content posing for this 73 years ago.

The age of these items called for a B&W conversion, as seen below.

1939 North East MD - B&W
1939 North East MD - B&W

Thanks for stopping by. ;-)

4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM
4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM
4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM
4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM

Chesapeake Wooden Boat Builders School

A few weeks ago I had the pleasure of visiting The Chesapeake Wooden Boat Builders School in Havre de Grace Maryland. It was a chance encounter that turned into a great time. I was in town to photograph the Concord Point Lighthouse (future post) and came upon a gentleman nearby who was opening what appeared to be a boat repair shop. Little did I know that the place was an actual school where they teach the craft of building and restoring wooden boats, mainly canoes. There were canoes inside that dated to 1940 and earlier. Talk about a great find, I was like a kid in a candy boat shop. :-) By the way, the town is located on the headwaters of the Chesapeake Bay where the Susquehanna River empties into it.

Tim (the gentleman I met) gave me the grand tour of the place and told me some great stories about the school's heritage and some history regarding this craft. There were even some old photographs inside to take me back to a bygone era. Speaking of photos, I posted this multi-processed shot of Oars and Canoes a week or so ago. Not far from the corner where I found that image I took the shot below.

Chesapeake Wooden Boat School
Chesapeake Wooden Boat School

Each of these canoes has been restored, saved from the scrap heap where they would likely have been burned to ashes. I learned a good deal about the restoration process while there, which is quite fascinating. The school's mission is to teach wooden boat building skills from readily available materials. It's there way of preserving the maritime heritage of the upper Chesapeake Bay. This is old fashioned boat building at it's very best.

Such a pleasurable visit was this that I plan to go again sometime soon. I promised the Co-Director, Mr. Bud Gillis that I would.

As you can see and as one might expect, an operation like this calls for a little creativity to get some photos, as you're working in close quarters.

Below I converted the image above to B&W.

Chesapeake Wooden Boat School - B&W
Chesapeake Wooden Boat School - B&W

If you are ever in Havre de Grace Maryland, you must swing by this place. It's located just below the Maritime Museum at 100 LaFayette Street.

We'll have a look at some other shots from the school soon.

Thanks for visiting!

4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM
4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM
4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM
4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM

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Jimi's Photos of Interest on Pinterest
Jimi's Photos of Interest on Pinterest