National Register of Historic Places

Seven Foot Knoll Light

Seven Foot Knoll Light

Built in 1855, the Seven Foot Knoll Light once occupied a spot at the mouth of the Patapsco River where it meets the mighty Chesapeake Bay. Like most 19th century lighthouses, it was manned by keepers over the years...

Sandy Point Mansion

Welcome, everyone! Today we have a look at an 18th century styled mansion that was actually built in 1815 for a prominently connected gentleman named John Gibson. Gibson was a relative of Samuel Ogle, Proprietory Governor of Maryland in 1731 - 1732. This Georgian house is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Commonly known as the Sandy Point Mansion, this two-story structure with two wings was once an elite farm house.

As you walk west from the shoreline of this beach shown in a previous post, you encounter this rear view of the house, approximately 300 yards from the water's edge.

Sandy Point Mansion - Rear View
Sandy Point Mansion - Rear View

The interior of the grand old house is closed to the public currently as a 3-year renovation project is underway, hence the ladder on the roof.

Below we have the view from the front of the house under a rapidly transitioning sky. Storms had been in the area during the overnight but this summer morning was a hazy, hot and humid affair.

Sandy Point Mansion - Front View
Sandy Point Mansion - Front View

Zooming in to the front entrance provides the view below.

Front Entrance to the Sandy Point Mansion
Front Entrance to the Sandy Point Mansion

According to one of the Park Rangers, this house will eventually be opened to the public after restoration. The process is a lengthy one since everything has to be recreated by hand using similar tools from the time of it's construction. For instance, there are no nails in the flooring, only hand made dowels.

Needless to say, I can hardly wait to get inside.

Thank you for stopping by.

4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM
4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM
4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM
4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM

Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse

Built in 1855 and once located at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay and the Patapsco River, it's the oldest screw-pile lighthouse in the state of Maryland.  It once stood on a shallow shoal but was decommissioned and relocated up river (the Patapsco's north branch ends at Baltimore's inner harbor) as a museum. The relocation occurred in 1988. Today you can walk right up to it as it sits on the harbor's promenade. Until it was automated in 1949, the lighthouse keeper and his family would live there year-round. Now that's tough duty during the Winter months with high winds, ice and no cover from the elements other than the lighthouse itself. Geez!

Let's begin with a walk down the aforementioned promenade on this bright, sunny, Summer morning.  The lighthouse is down on the left.

The Promenade
The Promenade

The Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse

Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse
Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse

An old historic structure like this deserves a B&W rendering.

Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse - B&W
Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse - B&W

In a future post we'll have a look at the inside of this historic lighthouse, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Thanks so much for visiting and have a great day!

4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM
4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM
4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM
4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM

Covered Bridge at Pequea Creek

Welcome back from what I hope was a wonderful weekend. The weather here in the eastern U S has been spectacular, with Summer-like temperatures returning. In all likelihood, this will only last for a short period of time but it is very energizing to say the least. In this post I serve up the first of the Covered Bridges series. I've been wanting to photo some of these for some time and have compiled a listing of these structures within driving distance of my home. Most of these are located in the Amish country of Lancaster County Pennsylvania, a county that has 29. Most date back to the 1800s and are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. They are also constructed of wood, which is likely the reason they were covered in the first place. I read that some of these are listed to be replaced with modern concrete structures, so the number of existing structures will decline as time moves on.

Today's covered bridges have been reconstructed on their original sites for the most part, but they not only bridge the gap across creeks and rivers but also takes us back in history. Each structure has a story to tell.

Today we visit the bridge at Pequea (Peck-Way) Creek, which was originally constructed in 1860.

Covered Bridge - Pequea Creek
Covered Bridge - Pequea Creek

Originally known as the Baumgardner Mill Covered Bridge, this structure was rehabilitated in 1987. What you see here is typical of the covered bridge styling with it's triangular corners and arch trusses.

Covered Bridge - Pequea Creek - Inside Detail
Covered Bridge - Pequea Creek - Inside Detail

A look at the inside detail lets us know that these must be most difficult to build. I do love the fact that you can see practically every piece of wood used in the construction of this structure. By the way, this particular bridge is extremely sturdy with no creaks, squeaks or swaying. Amazing!

Covered Bridge - Pequea Creek - Bottom
Covered Bridge - Pequea Creek - Bottom

Above is a look at the bottom of this 105 foot span.

We close out with this angled view I shot when I first arrived at the site.

Covered Bridge - Pequea Creek - Angled View
Covered Bridge - Pequea Creek - Angled View

Have a great day, folks!

4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM
4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM
4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM
4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM