baltimore maritime museum

Look, The USS Torsk!

Happy Monday, everyone! What a whirlwind week and weekend it has been. Several business opportunities and an Eastern Shore travel trip have kept me away from the online life for a few days. I have some catching up to do in terms of site visits and other online activities but I first want to thank everyone for coming by and supporting this site while I was away.

In terms of new business, I hope to break some news here in the not-so-distant future. For now however, let's move on to today's image.

We often hear of the many do's and don'ts of photography and why it is important to follow these tips and general rules. But there are times when we may be tempted to break the rules and go more radically in a creative direction. Take today's image of the USS Torsk for instance. I have chosen to completely ignore the "rule of thirds" here in order to include some other elements into the frame that I thought were important to my goal of showing this historic submarine in a manner not seen before. Yes, rules are created to guide and assist us and with great result more times than not. Then there are those times of exception.

Look, The USS Torsk
Look, The USS Torsk

Click image to enlarge or purchase

Docked outside the Baltimore Maritime Museum, this "Galloping ghost of the Japanese coast" (nickname) saw service in 1944 and 1945. It resides in this harbor among other historic ships like the Taney and Constellation. You can read more about it's history here, but back to that "rule of thirds". Do you strictly follow this rule or sometimes create compositions that ignore it completely?

USS Torks - Rule of Thirds Grid
USS Torks - Rule of Thirds Grid

As you can see, the target of this image is located in the top 1/3rd of the frame but I've used the pier posts to lead the way.

My vantage point was from the base of the World Trade Center, as seen on the shot position map below.

USS Torsk shot position
USS Torsk shot position

Thank you for visiting and I look forward to some of your comments below.

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4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM
4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM
4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM

In case you missed it this past weekend, here are Enough Awesome Photography Links to Drown a Fish!

USCGC Taney

A quick post and run today, my friends. My apologies for falling behind on site visits and support, I've found myself bogged down on a project, which has severely cut into my time unexpectedly. In the meantime, I thank you so much for stopping by and supporting my efforts here. It's greatly appreciated!

Today we have a look at an historic ship, the USCGC (United States Coast Guard Cutter) Taney, moored outside of the Baltimore Maritime Museum in the city's inner harbor. She was built in the 1930s in the Philadelphia Naval Yard and remained in service for nearly 50 years. What makes this ship particularly special? It is the last remaining ship afloat that saw battle duty in the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7th, 1941.

The ship was decommissioned at Portsmouth, Virginia and donated to the city of Baltimore. Roger B. Taney (pronounced taw-nee) was a Marylander from Calvert County.

I took the image below about a year or so ago. Enjoy!

USCGC Taney
USCGC Taney

Click image to enlarge or purchase

Thanks for clicking by!

4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM
4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM
4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM
4-4-2011 8-19-18 PM

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