ships

USCGC Eagle

Happy Columbus Day! Here in the US, this day is to commemorate the first journey to the Americas by Christopher Columbus in 1492. The actual date was October 12 but the Federal Government has move many "holidays" to Mondays, and this one falls on the 2nd Monday of October each year.

Since I have no photos (nor anyone else) of the Nina, the Pinta or the Santa Maria, I decided to at least post a tall ship image for today.

USCGC Eagle
USCGC Eagle

- Click image to enlarge or purchase -

This 295 foot vessel was launched in 1936 by Germany and transferred to the United States after World War II in 1946. The Eagle is used for training purposes and can often be found along the US east coast, although there was a year-long trip to Australia in 1987.

If you live in the Boston or New York areas, you may have likely seen this historic vessel in and around the harbors during tall ship gathering events.

Processing

Punch Settings - USCGC Eagle
Punch Settings - USCGC Eagle

What began as a 3-shot bracket run through HDR Efex Pro 2, ended up with me selecting the "0" exposure and processing it in Lightroom 4.

By the way, Lightroom 4.2 is now available (Update).

Once in LR , I applied the "Punch" preset that comes with the package and is located under the "Lightroom General Presets" dropdown.

Presets, as many of you know, make great starting points and after a few slider adjustments can dramatically change an image.

The settings shown here worked well for the image above, but every image is different and experimenting is always the best practice for the best results.

Thanks for visiting!

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Sunrise Off The Stern

"Sunrise off the stern" is a phrase one might hear while sailing the high seas aboard a large ship or boat, the stern being the rear or aft section of the vessel, for my non-nautical friends. :-) Such was the case in the image below as I stood across the outer harbor section of Baltimore along the Patapsco River. It was during that magic hour when the sun had just broken over the horizon and began to burn away what was a dense fog. At times like this the sky becomes a painter's palette, with nature doing the painting, and the results can often be stunning for a brief period.

Sunrise Off The Stern
Sunrise Off The Stern

- Click image to enlarge or purchase -

These large ships really stood out in a scene that I wanted to capture and remember. The peace and solitude of an early morning along the shoreline is something to behold.

Processing

LR Settings - Sunrise Off The Stern
LR Settings - Sunrise Off The Stern

Back at the computer, the images were opened in Lightroom 4 where one of several Sunrise presets (Sunrise 5) I've created was applied. Surprisingly, this was one of those instances where the job was done right then and there. Lucky me. ;-)

Thanks so much for visiting!

My first edition of the monthly newsletter is available for subscribers. This publication covers photography industry news and developments and contains helpful information for beginners and the advanced. I am excited about this and look forward to sharing the fun that lies ahead.

Interested parties can SUBSCRIBE HERE!

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Look, The USS Torsk!

Happy Monday, everyone! What a whirlwind week and weekend it has been. Several business opportunities and an Eastern Shore travel trip have kept me away from the online life for a few days. I have some catching up to do in terms of site visits and other online activities but I first want to thank everyone for coming by and supporting this site while I was away.

In terms of new business, I hope to break some news here in the not-so-distant future. For now however, let's move on to today's image.

We often hear of the many do's and don'ts of photography and why it is important to follow these tips and general rules. But there are times when we may be tempted to break the rules and go more radically in a creative direction. Take today's image of the USS Torsk for instance. I have chosen to completely ignore the "rule of thirds" here in order to include some other elements into the frame that I thought were important to my goal of showing this historic submarine in a manner not seen before. Yes, rules are created to guide and assist us and with great result more times than not. Then there are those times of exception.

Look, The USS Torsk
Look, The USS Torsk

Click image to enlarge or purchase

Docked outside the Baltimore Maritime Museum, this "Galloping ghost of the Japanese coast" (nickname) saw service in 1944 and 1945. It resides in this harbor among other historic ships like the Taney and Constellation. You can read more about it's history here, but back to that "rule of thirds". Do you strictly follow this rule or sometimes create compositions that ignore it completely?

USS Torks - Rule of Thirds Grid
USS Torks - Rule of Thirds Grid

As you can see, the target of this image is located in the top 1/3rd of the frame but I've used the pier posts to lead the way.

My vantage point was from the base of the World Trade Center, as seen on the shot position map below.

USS Torsk shot position
USS Torsk shot position

Thank you for visiting and I look forward to some of your comments below.

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In case you missed it this past weekend, here are Enough Awesome Photography Links to Drown a Fish!